The task of becoming sea-worthy

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The First Day…

So today was the first day I was at the boat.  Took 400 hi-res photos so I can inspect her more closely at the house.  Over all, she’s in good condition.  I think the crank that raises the keel is broken.  Why do I get the feeling that will be expensive.  I found an acronym for boat on the web:

Bring

On

Another

Thousand

I hope that’s not true.  Or maybe I just hope that the enjoyment of her will out-weigh the expense.  One thing she really needs is a good scrubbing from bow to stern.  After that we already have some ideas on where to start.

1.  paint inside & roofs of all hatch & compartments including doors.

2.  replace all seals on outside storage and hatch.

3. paint inside and roof of all unpainted storage compartments.

4.  figure out how to install new battery.

5.  replace 1 hatchdog knob.

6.  replace the teak boards and trim on the companionway.

7.  sand and stain all other teak on inside and outside of boat.

8.  repair large ding in fiberglass on stern near motor.

Spent the rest of the afternoon laying in the v-berth, hatch open, watching the clouds go by.  Listening to the sounds from the wires hitting the masts- ping- click-clang.  Sounded like an unusual wind chime that was off-key.  Boat was gently rocking back and forth.  Staring directly up and out the hatch, it was easy to pretend I was anchored off in some cove.  My nose kept looking for the salt smell in the air.  That will be an adjustment.  I’m on a lake – fresh water, not salt. It was relaxing all the same.

In the beginning…

In the beginning was the word.  Or words.  On-line manuals, video clips and books.  Spent a good time yesterday google searching the art of sailing, saving documents, bookmarking videos.  There’s a lot to learn.  Sometimes I like to type things out as it adds to my retention and understanding.

First up, parts of the boat:


The sailboat diagram above shows the parts of a sailboat labeled in a clockwise direction. These parts are each numbered and described below.

1.Forestay: The rigging that runs from the bow of the boat to the mast that the jib is attached to.

2.Jib Halyard: The line that is used to raise the jib. It is attached to the jib’s head, runs up to the mast, through a pulley and down the mast to a cleat at the bottom of the mast.

3.Jib’s Head: The top corner of the jib. This is the corner of the sail that is attached to the jib halyard.

4.Jib’s Leech: The after edge of the jib.

5.Jib’s Luff: The forward edge of the jib that is attached to the forestay.

6.Jib: The smaller sail toward the bow of the boat.

7.Jib’s Clew: The lower after corner that attaches to the jib sheets.

8.Jib’s Foot: The bottom edge of the jib.

9.Deck: The top flat surface of the boat.

10.Bow: The front of the boat.

11.Keel: A vertical fin that is weighted and that acts as a counterweight that offsets the force of the wind that is pushing the boat sideways.

12.Jib Sheet: The lines that are attached to the jib’s clew that are used to trim the sail.

13.Hull: The body of the boat.

14.Main Sheet: The lines that are attached to the mainsail’s clew that are used to trim the sail.

15.Stern: The back of the boat.

16.Rudder: The vertical steering foil attached to the stern of the boat.

17.Tiller: The wooden arm that is used to control the direction the rudder is turned.

18.Boom: The horizontal bar (or spar) that is attached to the foot of the mainsail.

19.Eyelet: The circular hole that is at each corner of the sails that is used to attach lines to the sail or to attach the sail to the mast or boom.

20.Main Clew: The lower after corner that attaches to the mainsail sheets.

21.Main Foot: The bottom edge of the mainsail.

22.Main Tack: The lower forward corner of the mainsail.

23.Shroud: The rigging that runs from the top portion of the mast to the side of the boat. This prevents the mast from leaning too far to the side.

24.Main Leech: The after edge of the mainsail.

25.Main Luff: The forward edge of the mainsail that is attached to the mast.

26.Mainsail: The sail that is hoisted up the mast and attached to the boom.

27.Batten: A plastic or wooden slat that is attached to the sail that prevents the sail from losing its shape.

28.Main Head: The top corner of the mainsail. This is the corner of the sail that is attached to the main halyard.

29.Main Halyard: The line that is used to raise the mainsail. It is attached to the mainsail’s head, runs up to the mast, through a pulley and down the mast to a cleat at the bottom of the mast.

30.Mast: The long vertical spar that runs up the center of the boat and to which the sails are attached.

Cleaning the sails